I understand where you're coming from, Johnny, and thanks for being here. However, I would argue that there is precisely this kind of market for men. Men willing to open up about their emotions and present themselves vulnerable, confused and humble are doing exceptionally well. Just look at Justin Baldoni and his "Man Enough" series (and now book).

I would also direct you to the "bookstagram" sub-genre of Instagram influencer, where men willing to open up about their favourite books do incredibly well. Some men do better in terms of likes and comments when engaging humbly and emotionally, even when producing almost identical content to a woman -- see James Travino and Elizbath Sagan on Instagram and Tiktok, for example.

The high-earning man image, the LeBrons and David Beckhams, are male typologies that seek to appeal to other men, not women. This issue has been discussed endlessly on social media -- by women!

Until male influencers begin to tap into their emotional, honest sides, I don't think they will succeed as well collectively on social media.

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Specialist in modern authoritarianism, feminist, political scientist in progress (PhD). Everyday academia, low-brow, no jargon/acronyms/obscure Latin.

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Abbey Heffer

Abbey Heffer

Specialist in modern authoritarianism, feminist, political scientist in progress (PhD). Everyday academia, low-brow, no jargon/acronyms/obscure Latin.

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